Hate crimes 'fabricated'?

Ukip boss says police figures are 'overblown'

BBC

'Record hate crimes' after EU referendum - BBC News

A majority of police forces in England and Wales saw record levels of hate crimes in the first full three months following the EU referendum, according to new analysis.

More than 14,000 hate crimes were recorded between July and September.

In 10 forces the number of suspected hate crimes increased by more than 50%, compared to the previous three months.

Police say their own monitoring suggests incidents have levelled out after the summer's spike.

Last October the Home Office published provisional figures which suggested the number of hate crimes in July 2016 had been 41% higher than 12 months earlier.

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What's to be done about hate crime?

Downing Street urged the public to stand up to hate crime in January after the UK’s equalities chief warned a surge in violence could be sparked by triggering Article 50.

The Prime Minister’s official spokeswoman said people should “call out” any attacks on EU citizens in the UK that might follow the start of Brexit’s formal process.

“Where there is hate crime, we should stand up to it, call it out and take action and make very clear it is not acceptable in this country”, she said.

Hate crimes surged in the month following the UK’s vote to leave the EU last June, with a 41% increase in reports to the police, compared to the previous year.

There were 3,886 such crimes logged in July 2015, rising to 5,468 in July 2016, according to the Home Office.

The number of hate crimes overall in the year 2015-16 was up 19% on the previous year. Last year's figures show that 62,518 offences were recorded by police.

Of these, 79% were motivated by race hate, 12% by sexual orientation, 7% by religion, 6% by disability and 1% were transgender hate crimes.

New statistics published this week by the police demonstrate that post-referendum hate crime soared, in some areas by as much as 100% in some areas.

Police forces across the UK are ramping up intelligence gathering and putting protection in place for vulnerable communities ahead of a projected spike in hate crime when Theresa May triggers Article 50 next month.

Hate crimes on social media are also to be targeted in a £250,000 project by Cardiff University experts focusing on Brexit.

They aim to develop a monitoring tool to help police and government officials curb cases on websites like Twitter.

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall has claimed the officially recorded spike in racist attacks following Britain’s Brexit referendum was “fabricated”. Mr Nuttall told The Independent that such incidents had been “overblown” in an attempt to tarnish the Leave campaign’s victory.

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Independent

Ukip leader claims rise in hate crimes after the Brexit vote is 'fabricated'

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall has claimed the officially recorded spike in racist attacks following Britain's Brexit referendum was "fabricated". Despite police figures showing a clear rise in the number of reported hate crimes in the wake of the vote, Mr Nuttall told The Independent that such incidents had been "overblown" in an attempt to tarnish the Leave campaign's victory.

His claims, immediately slammed by anti-racism groups, were also contradicted by new statistics published today demonstrating post-referendum hate crime soared, including in Staffordshire where Mr Nuttall is now fighting a by-election to become an MP.

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