Apathy on Brexit?

Many in the UK are sick and tired of Brexit

The Guardian

Why YouGov poll shows support for a people's Brexit vote is solid

Thirty years ago this week, Jacques Delors came to Bournemouth to urge Britain's trade unions to change their stance on Europe. The president of the European commission told TUC delegates that the EU was good for workers' jobs, workers' rights and workers' living standards. It was a decisive moment in the union movement's relationship with Brussels.

This week could be equally decisive for the TUC - perhaps even more so - given the precarious balance of forces at Westminster. And the clear message from YouGov's poll of more than 2,700 members of the TUC's three biggest unions is that most trade union members think Brexit is bad for jobs; they want a fresh public vote and the chance to keep the UK in the EU.

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Do people just want Brexit to be over and done with?

By Joe Harker

When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union back in 2016 most would have been forgiven for expecting things to be sorted by now. The referendum result was never going to be the last word on Brexit but most would have assumed that the negotiations would not become so bogged down by infighting in the Tory party and an inability to have one's cake and eat it too.

While there has not been any sort of agreement on what Brexit should be or whether it is still the right course for the UK to pursue, one part of it has a majority of Leavers and Remainers agreeing. The public is now so sick of Brexit that 60 per cent just want the damn thing to be over and don't care how it gets done.

Former Labour MP David Miliband argues that if people are so sick of Brexit then they should "get shot of Brexit", stressing the importance of caring about one of the most important political decisions the UK has had to face. Miliband also suggested that apathy towards Brexit meant the concerns of Leave voters would not be addressed.

Supporters of Remain should also be worried about apathy towards Brexit, according to The Guardian's Rafael Behr. He writes that the biggest problem for Remain supporters who are still making the case for staying in the EU and pushing for a People's Vote is that many voters have switched off from Brexit. Their primary issue isn't winning over Leave voters and convincing them that Brexit is the wrong choice for the UK, it's getting people to be enthusiastic about something they just want to go away and be over.

Through it all Theresa May's Brexit plan has been to "keep calm and carry on" according to Laura Kuenssburg, the BBC's Political Editor. Under fire from her own party and the bits of the public that still care about Brexit, the Prime Minister keeps plodding on towards the end date of March 29

There might actually be some respite at the end of a very long tunnel. More than two years since the referendum result there is some optimism that the negotiations can be completed in a matter of weeks. Sure, it's for pushing through Theresa May's Chequers deal that the public likes less than the Poll Tax but most people would rather get it over with now.

The apathetic Leave voters run the risk of not getting the deal they wanted when they chose to bring the UK out of the EU. The apathetic Remain voters risk sitting by and doing nothing while a chance to stop Brexit passes by. They just want it to be over.

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It's time to admit we're all bored of Brexit

There's no getting around it, talk of Brexit is becoming tiring. You're not alone in feeling like you're starting to not care.

There's no getting around it, talk of Brexit is becoming tiring. You're not alone in feeling like you're starting to not care. This process will be one of the most important events for generations though, so it's time we find a better way to engage with our departure from Europe than this never-ending news cycle, writes Michael Segalov.

My name is Michael, Im 24-years-old, and I'm really, really bored of Brexit.

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