Planet's time running out?

David Attenborough warned that the collapse of civilization could occur

The Guardian

Trump officials argue climate change warnings based on 'worst-case scenario'

The Trump administration has a new strategy for deflecting concerns about the warming planet.

Trump officials are minimizing warnings from scientists by arguing they are exaggerated and based on the worst-case scenario. They say the National Climate Assessment (NCA) – an expansive federal government report on the dangers of climate change in the US – considers only the highest possible levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

“If you take the extreme case, you’re right, it’s dire,” Trump’s interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, said on Fox News. “If you take the best case, it’s not much.”

Zinke, who has encouraged fossil fuel production on public lands, compared climate risks to the chance of nuclear war.

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Will climate change lead to the collapse of civilization?

By Joe Harker

Speaking at the opening ceremony of the United Nations climate talks in Poland, Sir David Attenborough said climate change is the biggest threat the human race has faced for thousands of years and called on world leaders to act before it was too late. He said: "Right now, we are facing a man-made disaster of global scale. Our greatest threat in thousands of years. Climate change.

"If we don't take action, the collapse of our civilisations and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon. The world's people have spoken. Their message is clear. Time is running out. They want you, the decision-makers, to act now."

A UN report warns that the world has little more than 12 years to tackle climate change before it suffers irreversible damage. If sufficient action has not been taken by 2030 the risk of drought, floods and extreme heat will increase and affect hundreds of millions of people.

Another report suggests global efforts to stop climate change need to be tripled to have sufficient effect and save the planet. The report warned of a "tremendous gap between words and deeds" as leaders meet often to make climate agreements but little actual progress is made. We've only got one planet to live on so it would be quite prudent not to destroy it through our own excesses.

Writing for the Financial Times, Simon Kuper warns that people in the richest countries will only start demanding action en masse when it starts to directly affect them, which will be too late. He suggests that those who want to save the planet from man made climate change need to work out how to sell it to the mega rich. Kuper suggests selling the idea as "green growth" rather than an attempt to save the world.

For all our progress humans can be a ridiculously insular and self serving species, willing to exploit the world for profit without realising that this exploitation will likely render all the profit meaningless in the long run. Going green should be sold as the new direction for the economy, the next gravy train for everyone to jump on with the added side effect of saving the planet. Perhaps the only way some of the most influential people will help stop climate change is if they can be convinced there's profit in it.

Some world leaders aren't sold on the idea that climate change will be so bad for the world. US president Donald Trump is skeptical of reports warning that immediate and decisive action must be taken, but climate change doesn't run on belief and will continue to happen whether he agrees with it or not.

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Sir David Attenborough Predicts the 'Collapse of Civilization' at UN Climate Summit

Sir David Attenborough spoke at a UN Climate Summit in Katowice, Poland, warning that climate change could lead to the collapse of civilization if action isn't taken.

You're probably used to hearing Sir David Attenborough's sonorous, British voice describe the miracles of pufferfish courtship and blooming stink flowers in nature documentaries like "Planet Earth" and "Blue Planet.

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